How To Make Quick And Useful Decisions

H

Have you ever been in a situation where you had to make a decision quickly and there was no time for research? If so, then this blog post is for you. In this post, I’ll discuss how to make quick decisions that are useful while avoiding bad decisions. With all of the information available at our fingertips today, it is easy to get overwhelmed with too many choices and options that are all equally good. So let’s see how some simple rules and using your intuition can help alleviate some of the stress involved in making difficult decisions quickly!

As with any decision, having a decision-making process will help you at any time and will increase all types of decisions for you over time.

Avoid making decisions when you’re tired 

One of the worst things you can do it make a decision when you’re tired. Decisions made when you’re tired are often short-sighted and don’t take into account all the information available. This can lead to bad decisions and experiences later on.

Being tired means that your brain is not going to make full use of all of the information available to you, and is instead going focus on what feels right in that moment.

This may not be a good idea if your needs or wants are different from how they were when making rational decisions earlier. Our mind is capable of some amazing outcomes but making good judgements when you’re tired isn’t one of them.

Avoid making decisions in the heat of the moment 

When your emotions are involved you can run into even more troubles. The best way to avoid emotions in your decision making is to take a step back and consider the decision.

Break it down into what you want, how much of each thing that will be needed for your goal (time, money, people, etc), can this resource really get me there, and is now actually an appropriate time?

Taking the time to consider the decision can still be done quickly and will let you “cool down”.

When you are not thinking clearly, take a step back and consider all aspects to make sure it is really what’s best for your needs.

The key takeaway: don’t do anything impulsively if there isn’t an immediate need or want driving that decision—take time before acting on impulse so as avoid regret. If we can remember these two things then our lives will be much better off without having made any serious mistakes (or at least many fewer).

Make a list and pick one choice (Widen your options)

If all else fails you can quickly jot down your choices and then pick one from the list. This is also a good idea if you are feeling indecisive about what decision to make and there isn’t any time pressure or need for immediate action in order that it be made now (or at least right away).

Also, widening your options by creating more choices is one of the key ways to make good decisions in the first place.

This is one reason why it’s important to recognize the benefits in having more than just a few options. If you’re feeling really overwhelmed about what decision needs made then try narrowing them (or at least already recognizing that there are many possible solutions).

Consider what your decision will do for you, not what it will take away from you

Don’t let fear get in the way of your decisions.

The point is to make a decision that satisfies your needs. Even if the choice you’re making isn’t perfect, it’s going be better than doing nothing at all or delaying because of indecision and fear.

Consider what good results could come from the options you have available to you.

Don’t let fear be the thing that stops your from making a decision and taking action in life. It’s generally better than doing nothing at all – but that’s another topic entirely!

About the author

Adam Moody

I'm Adam Moody with the Productivity Academy. Get your productivity, time management, automation, and organization questions answered here. Be sure to check out the Productivity Academy YouTube Channel and the Real World Productivity Group.
 

Looking for some great resources to help increase your productivity starting today? Click here for the Productivity Academy Resources.

Add comment

By Adam Moody

Subscribe on YouTube

Subscribe for special access & more